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Frame arms girl question

I recently watched the frame arms girl anime and at first I was like this is just a commercial but ended up loving all the girls and their distinct personalities. I'm interested in getting them, but they are model kits and have no idea if I'll be able to do it, so can someone tell me if they're difficult to do or not? (keep in mind never done a model kit before) What are your experiences with them?

Kind regards
Skellington
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    13 commenti

    0pt
    I randomly bought my first model kit not having any experience working with any tool, and it was actually very easy. You do need nippers which it the only tool i got for it.
    The frame arms i bought (innocentia) has the exactly right friction on all her parts so that no extra modification was necessary at all, i also have like 20 little armory guns, they were more problematic and needed glue or blue tack.

    So if u want modelkits just get it, ull probably acquire tools as u need them.

    A bit warning tho, while frame arms are good quality the plastic is very brittle, and as a result ive broke it a bunch, the leg joint and the pigtails, ive repaired the legs, but not the pigtails :C (help lol) .
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    nyugvo6 (2 mese/i fa) #22399429By disagreements I meant things clashing with my personal taste such as:
    Price. They're crazy expensive compared to other companies's model kits.
    Number and thickness of runners (aka plastic wasted, which boosts the price)
    The quality/feel of the plastic. It feels rigid and brittle.
    The need to use glue, or as Bayuro said plastic cement.
    I think all the tools you need were featured in the show.
    First and foremost nippers. (do not buy godhand ones, they're unnecessarily expensive)
    Then filers to remove nubs, and sanding paper to clear up the nubmarks left.
    Painting is optional, but some of them badly need a paintjob. (Stylet, Gourai K2)
    You'll need a brush set, paint, thinner, masking tape. Something for panel lining, and topcoat to give them a finish.
    An airbrush set maybe (airbrushing mask with filters are a must for this unless you want paint in your lungs).
    You need plastic cement because the manual tells you to use it. My kotobukiya eva kit fell apart at the biceps whenever I tried to bend the elbow, because I assembled it without any glue at first.
    A special note for frame arms girl kits: The coat hanger shaped piece in the pelvis area is VERY fragile. You should sand it's arms a bit to avoid too much friction. The wristjoints break easy.
    If you break one, for a quick fix get this: ITEM #577549
    It might sound scary or overwhelming now but trust me, you don't have to be afraid. Kotobukiya kits are fine, and building is half of the fun. You will enjoy the process. Remember, these model kits were designed for kids and teenagers. They're easy to build. If you're unsure, buy with caution. Get your favorite girl first and see if kit building is for you. Then get the rest.
    Could you post a pic of the sword assembled without the black middle part? Is it a possible configuration?


    Sorry I couldn't do exactly as you asked but here's the instruction manual of the weapon part, the black part just connects the long 2 handed weapons, but she does come with a lot of other weapons such as large knives/swords... picture/1779555...
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    Skellington (2 mese/i fa) #22411734thanks for the info, it does seem overwhelming but I'll look into it a bit more when my exams are over.
    Is it a special sort of nippers?? And what do you use the glue/plastic cement for? (aren't the pieces just supposed to click together?)

    Yes. Godhand nippers are unique, and produce great results. They are easier to break however and very, very expensive. It's better to use normal nippers.
    Pieces do click together. Or at least slide into place and hold firmly. Most of the time.
    I used standard loctite on my eva kit.
    www.1999.co.jp/... step 3, h1. that is the 'use glue' icon.
    You can use hobbysearch to look up the instructions.
    www.1999.co.jp/... here's Materia's, step3, d8 has the same icon.
    The kits won't fall apart and pieces won't go flying, even if you don't use glue/plastic cement.
    Playing with them might be a different story, but you can tell after you put one together if it's needed at all. youtu.be/4qOUx_... here's a video of the building process.
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    Skellington (2 mese/i fa) #22411734thanks for the info, it does seem overwhelming but I'll look into it a bit more when my exams are over.
    Is it a special sort of nippers?? And what do you use the glue/plastic cement for? (aren't the pieces just supposed to click together?)

    Nippers for cutting the pieces out of the runners: www.1999.co.jp/...
    You really need one of these to cut the pieces cleanly from the runners.

    The plastic cement is for permanently securing the pegs into the pegholes so that the pieces don't fall apart with handling. True that all the pieces are supposed to snapfit tightly together, but depending on design and molding quality, there are times where the pieces fit but not as tightly as you want. www.google.com....
    I highly highly recommend the Tamiya Extra Thin. When working with plastic cement, remember not to huff the fumes.

    I would also recommend buying a cheap cheap cheap Gunpla kit and test your ability and tools out whilst getting the hang of assembling a model kit for the first time before attempting an actual Frame Arms Girl kit.
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    nyugvo6 (2 mese/i fa) #22399429By disagreements I meant things clashing with my personal taste such as:
    Price. They're crazy expensive compared to other companies's model kits.
    Number and thickness of runners (aka plastic wasted, which boosts the price)
    The quality/feel of the plastic. It feels rigid and brittle.
    The need to use glue, or as Bayuro said plastic cement.
    I think all the tools you need were featured in the show.
    First and foremost nippers. (do not buy godhand ones, they're unnecessarily expensive)
    Then filers to remove nubs, and sanding paper to clear up the nubmarks left.
    Painting is optional, but some of them badly need a paintjob. (Stylet, Gourai K2)
    You'll need a brush set, paint, thinner, masking tape. Something for panel lining, and topcoat to give them a finish.
    An airbrush set maybe (airbrushing mask with filters are a must for this unless you want paint in your lungs).
    You need plastic cement because the manual tells you to use it. My kotobukiya eva kit fell apart at the biceps whenever I tried to bend the elbow, because I assembled it without any glue at first.
    A special note for frame arms girl kits: The coat hanger shaped piece in the pelvis area is VERY fragile. You should sand it's arms a bit to avoid too much friction. The wristjoints break easy.
    If you break one, for a quick fix get this: ITEM #577549
    It might sound scary or overwhelming now but trust me, you don't have to be afraid. Kotobukiya kits are fine, and building is half of the fun. You will enjoy the process. Remember, these model kits were designed for kids and teenagers. They're easy to build. If you're unsure, buy with caution. Get your favorite girl first and see if kit building is for you. Then get the rest.
    Could you post a pic of the sword assembled without the black middle part? Is it a possible configuration?


    thanks for the info, it does seem overwhelming but I'll look into it a bit more when my exams are over.
    Is it a special sort of nippers?? And what do you use the glue/plastic cement for? (aren't the pieces just supposed to click together?)
    2 mese/i fa
    1pt
    Skellington (2 mese/i fa) #22383541How do you mean disagreements? What kind of tools do you need and why would I need glue?
    By disagreements I meant things clashing with my personal taste such as:
    Price. They're crazy expensive compared to other companies's model kits.
    Number and thickness of runners (aka plastic wasted, which boosts the price)
    The quality/feel of the plastic. It feels rigid and brittle.
    The need to use glue, or as Bayuro said plastic cement.

    I think all the tools you need were featured in the show.
    First and foremost nippers. (do not buy godhand ones, they're unnecessarily expensive)
    Then filers to remove nubs, and sanding paper to clear up the nubmarks left.
    Painting is optional, but some of them badly need a paintjob. (Stylet, Gourai K2)
    You'll need a brush set, paint, thinner, masking tape. Something for panel lining, and topcoat to give them a finish.
    An airbrush set maybe (airbrushing mask with filters are a must for this unless you want paint in your lungs).

    You need plastic cement because the manual tells you to use it. My kotobukiya eva kit fell apart at the biceps whenever I tried to bend the elbow, because I assembled it without any glue at first.

    A special note for frame arms girl kits: The coat hanger shaped piece in the pelvis area is VERY fragile. You should sand it's arms a bit to avoid too much friction. The wristjoints break easy.
    If you break one, for a quick fix get this: ITEM #577549

    It might sound scary or overwhelming now but trust me, you don't have to be afraid. Kotobukiya kits are fine, and building is half of the fun. You will enjoy the process. Remember, these model kits were designed for kids and teenagers. They're easy to build. If you're unsure, buy with caution. Get your favorite girl first and see if kit building is for you. Then get the rest.

    Darkdman00 (2 mese/i fa) #22391799I'd say go for it! This is my first one I did and really liked putting it together.
    picture/1734201...

    Could you post a pic of the sword assembled without the black middle part? Is it a possible configuration?
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    I'd say go for it! This is my first one I did and really liked putting it together.
    picture/1734201...
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    nyugvo6 (2 mese/i fa) #22359839As a beginner kit builder, I never had problems with kotobukiya kits (but plenty disagreements). All you'll require is patience and care. Oh, and tools. Some gluing is required. Tamiya cement is the practical choice.
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    I feel like building that Gundam Build Fighters Try Super Fumina when I looked at the instructions of Frame Arms Girl.
    2 mese/i fa
    0pt
    nyugvo6 (2 mese/i fa) #22359839As a beginner kit builder, I never had problems with kotobukiya kits (but plenty disagreements). All you'll require is patience and care. Oh, and tools. Some gluing is required.

    How do you mean disagreements? What kind of tools do you need and why would I need glue?
    2 mese/i fa
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